Newly-Listed Educational Resource: “Maths Doctor”

A reader in the United Kingdom has very kindly brought to our attention this free resource which she recommends.  She writes, “My daughter Chloe has been using a great resource for GCSE and A level maths teachers and pupils here [and she gives the link].
We publish this link for the information of teachers and home-schooling parents.  The resource is called “Maths Doctor,” and it is found at www.mathsdoctor.co.uk/resources/  .   We are adding it to our list of “Educational Resources for Parents” at  http://www.bcptl.org/?p=1775.

We encourage teachers and parents to let us know of on-line resources that have helped their students or children.  We hope to pass on information of this kind to our readers.

Force sex education on all schools, says Clegg [U.K.]

Force sex education on all schools, says Clegg: Lib Dems plan to make all state institutions, including primaries, teach pupils aged seven and over

  • David Laws will say sex education should be central part of education
  • Lib Dems argue that it helps all pupils become ‘good citizens’
  • The move is backed by Labour but opposed by the Conservatives
  • Critics say sex education should be left to parents to teach Continue reading

Mississippi Remixed Trailer

It was in a Canadian classroom that teacher Myra Ottewell, born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, started on a journey to her past. After watching the film Mississippi Burning, students could not believe that it was possible for Myra or other white Mississippians to have had anything but disrespectful, hated or bigoted relationships with African Americans in the 60s. And they doubted things had changed much since.

Frustrated that Canadians had nothing good to say about her state, Myra embarked on a personal journey to investigate the past, returning to her birthplace in Jackson, Mississippi. There she met James Meredith, the first black student to enroll in the University of Mississippi and Dolphus Weary, who left the state on a basketball scholarship and wrote the book, I Ain’t Comin Back. He did return and now runs an organization dedicated to building authentic relationships along racial lines.

But as Myra delved deeper into understanding race relations, she uncovered harsh and troubling information. Growing up white in the segregated South, so well portrayed in Harper Lee’s 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Myra had been sheltered from the hate crimes taking place in her state. These intense truths forced her to wrestle with demons of her past, as she gained a deeper understanding of race relations and “white privilege.” Her personal exploration celebrates the transformations occurring and proves that not forgetting Mississippi’s painful past is the key to finding true racial reconciliation.

“…a story that is not uncommon and one that still continues today right here where racism still manifests itself in subtle and not so subtle ways.”
- Karen Rolston, Centre for Intercultural Communication, UBC Continuing Studies

Zoodle–a resource for teachers and parents of primary-level children

In the category of teaching and homeschooling resources, we are adding a link to “Zoodle” games.  At this site there are many games, classified from “toddler’ to “Third Grade” and from games for two-year-olds to eight-year-olds.  The ones we tried seemed generally well-designed and educationally sound.  In addition to games there are books with stories.

As with other resources we link to, we do not guarantee the quality of this resource, and emphasize the importance of the teacher or parent examining the resource carefully.

Parents: Addtional Educational Resources (at Khan Academy online)

Khan Academy heads its website with the slogan “Learn almost anything for free.”  It’s resources, which are extensive, are apparently mostly centred on mathematics or related subjects.  (A search for “Literature” yielded no results, but there are resources on the humanities.)

The link for Khan Academy is http://www.khanacademy.org/  . Continue reading